Everything You Need to Know About Making a Media Kit for your Makeup or Beauty Blog

When bloggers decide it’s time to reach out to brands, they typically write an email and ask for something--money, samples, a guest post or items for a giveaway. This email is a crucial starting point. It’s probably the first time the person will introduce their brand to this new company. This first impression should be strategically thought out. You’ll want to make sure your blog is ready for the brand to see, and you’ll want to have a fantastic, informative, visually pleasing media kit.

A media kit is a document that tells a brand all about your blog. It's the introduction to your brand. Think of it as the preview of a movie. You watch some of the coolest parts of the movie all compiled together, and if you like it, you'll probably make more of an effort to see the whole thing. Your aim is to make your media kit compelling enough that the brand’s interest will be peaked, and they’ll check out your site, social media, fulfill your requests, or add you to their press list.  

There are many reasons why you might need a media kit, including:
 

  1. Landing a sponsorship

  2. Getting your product into a store

  3. Appearing on a podcast

  4. Pitching an ambassadorship

  5. Going to a conference

  6. Sharing at a meetup

  7. Applying for a guest post

  8. Sending in as a featured guest

  9. Working with another blogger

  10. Sending in for a media statement

  11. Hosting an event

  12. Asking for a press pass

The Brand’s Point of View

Brands are getting pitched by bloggers left and right. In order to break through the noise and stand out, you've got to give them something that will catch their eye and make them insist on finding out more about you. When I started making my media kit back in the day, I remember reading articles that didn’t put importance on the look of a media kit. But after a few years of research (and plenty of trial and error), I’ve realized that presentation is everything. I've heard people say, "Oh, I just threw my stats and my website on a Word doc and sent it in". My first thought was, "huh?" You want to create a document that's so chic, so compelling, so interesting that the brand has to learn more. Show your best self! Creating a media kit that is thoughtfully put together, that shows effort, and is consistent with your branding--that’s a great media kit.

I’ve seen media kits that were one page and perfectly laid out. I’ve also seen one pager’s that were so crammed with info and colors and pictures that I could barely get through it. My rule of thumb? Make your kit as long as it needs to be to share the information that makes you stand out.  

What's included

Your media kit is made of several components that give a general overview of your blog. You’ll want to be very strategic about what you share. Make sure that everything puts you in the best light possible. If you have a high bounce rate, don't share it. If you have low traffic, play up your great content.

You’ll want to definitely include the following (Feel free to download a handy checklist here):

  • Your Name

  • Your Blog’s Name

  • Contact Information

  • Mission Statement and/or Personal Biography

  • Page views per Month/Quarter/Year

  • Visitors per Month/Quarter/Year

  • Reader Demographics

  • Drool-Worthy Photos

  • Social Media Links and Stats

And these are optional:

  • Ad Rates and Sponsor Opportunities

  • Collaborations/Awards/Mentions/Speaking Engagements

As a beauty blogger, you can stand out by showcasing a few of your most unique factors. These might include:

  • Typical amount of products used for skincare, makeup and hair 
  • Series (I liked to highlight my 'Quest for the Perfect Foundation' series when I pitched for face products
  • Quality photos of your beauty routine 

How to make your media kit

There are several ways that you can make a media kit. Many people choose to use Microsoft Word or PowerPoint, others use Adobe Photoshop or InDesign. I’m a big fan of using the cloud, so I teach people how to create media kits with free web based platforms, using Google Docs and Canva. I even created a web-based media kit on a subdomain (cool concept, but it has its pros and cons). I’ve included a few design ideas in the media kit crash course.

Go the extra mile to stand out

After you’ve made your media kit, it might seem like you’re done with the process. But if you want to stand out and catch the PR person’s eye, do something that will will surprise them. I use my media kit for several different purposes, including pitching for samples, forming new relationships, or even as an attachment for a proposal when I want to speak at a conference. The more difficult or high value the request, the more editing I do to my kit for that specific occurrence.

For instance, when I want to speak somewhere, I include more images of me speaking, and I might emphasize past speaking gigs in my pitch, and share links to the host’s website to establish my credibility.  If I were to pitch a company for an article of clothing, I’d swap out some images from my general media kit, and I’d replace them with images of me wearing the brand’s clothing (and I’d point it out in my email pitch).
 

Now what?

Now that you’ve got your shiny new media kit, it’s time to send it out there to those dream collaborators. Draft your pitch, make sure it’s error free, and send that baby out. Here’s a quick, bare bones overview of the process:

First, you should introduce yourself and your blog. You should then tell a little bit about your blog. Make sure you explain what makes you different, and why working with you is a value to the company. Next, you should do “the ask”, and be specific about what your request is. After that, tell the brand exactly what you’ll do for them in return. (Never, ever forget W.I.I.F.M- What’s in it for me?) Be sure to place a link to your media kit and an attachment in the email. Make it as easy as possible for them to find out about you.

If your request doesn’t work out, do not give up. You’ve taken the first step to a brand new relationship. You can pitch again, this time with a different request, or possibly you’ve got something new to share. Put yourself in the brand’s shoes, and go another angle. Either way, you’ve got a brand new media kit, and your blogging and small business opportunities are endless!



 


 

The Ultimate Guide to Creating a Media Kit for Your Blog or Business

media kit for bloggers

When bloggers decide it’s time to reach out to brands, they typically write an email and ask for something--money, samples, a guest post or items for a giveaway. This email is a crucial starting point. It’s probably the first time the person will introduce their brand to this new company. This first impression should be strategically thought out. You’ll want to make sure your blog is ready for the brand to see, and you’ll want to have a fantastic, informative, visually pleasing media kit.

A media kit is a document that tells a brand all about your blog. It's the introduction to your brand. Think of it as the preview of a movie. You watch some of the coolest parts of the movie all compiled together, and if you like it, you'll probably make more of an effort to see the whole thing. Your aim is to make your media kit compelling enough that the brand’s interest will be peaked, and they’ll check out your site, social media, fulfill your requests, or add you to their press list.  

There are many reasons why you might need a media kit, including:
 

  1. Landing a sponsorship

  2. Getting your product into a store

  3. Appearing on a podcast

  4. Pitching an ambassadorship

  5. Going to a conference

  6. Sharing at a meetup

  7. Applying for a guest post

  8. Sending in as a featured guest

  9. Working with another blogger

  10. Sending in for a media statement

  11. Hosting an event

  12. Asking for a press pass

The Brand’s Point of View

Brands are getting pitched by bloggers left and right. In order to break through the noise and stand out, you've got to give them something that will catch their eye and make them insist on finding out more about you. When I started making my media kit back in the day, I remember reading articles that didn’t put importance on the look of a media kit. But after a few years of research (and plenty of trial and error), I’ve realized that presentation is everything. I've heard people say, "Oh, I just threw my stats and my website on a Word doc and sent it in". My first thought was, "huh?" You want to create a document that's so chic, so compelling, so interesting that the brand has to learn more. Show your best self! Creating a media kit that is thoughtfully put together, that shows effort, and is consistent with your branding--that’s a great media kit.

I’ve seen media kits that were one page and perfectly laid out. I’ve also seen one pager’s that were so crammed with info and colors and pictures that I could barely get through it. My rule of thumb? Make your kit as long as it needs to be to share the information that makes you stand out.  

What's included

Your media kit is made of several components that give a general overview of your blog. You’ll want to be very strategic about what you share. Make sure that everything puts you in the best light possible. If you have a high bounce rate, don't share it. If you have low traffic, play up your great content.

You’ll want to definitely include the following (Feel free to download a handy checklist here):

  • Your Name

  • Your Blog’s Name

  • Contact Information

  • Mission Statement and/or Personal Biography

  • Pageviews per Month/Quarter/Year

  • Visitors per Month/Quarter/Year

  • Reader Demographics

  • Drool-Worthy Photos

  • Social Media Links and Stats

And these are optional:

  • Ad Rates and Sponsor Opportunities

  • Collaborations/Awards/Mentions/Speaking Gigs

How to make your media kit

There are several ways that you can make a media kit. Many people choose to use Microsoft Word or PowerPoint, others use Adobe Photoshop or InDesign. I’m a big fan of using the cloud, so I teach people how to create media kits with free web based platforms, using Google Docs and Canva. I even created a web-based media kit on a subdomain (cool concept, but it has its pros and cons). I’ve included a few design ideas in the media kit crash course.

Go the extra mile to stand out

After you’ve made your media kit, it might seem like you’re done with the process. But if you want to stand out and catch the PR person’s eye, do something that will will surprise them. I use my media kit for several different purposes, including pitching for samples, forming new relationships, or even as an attachment for a proposal when I want to speak at a conference. The more difficult or high value the request, the more editing I do to my kit for that specific occurrence.

For instance, when I want to speak somewhere, I include more images of me speaking, and I might emphasize past speaking gigs in my pitch, and share links to the host’s website to establish my credibility.  If I were to pitch a company for an article of clothing, I’d swap out some images from my general media kit, and I’d replace them with images of me wearing the brand’s clothing (and I’d point it out in my email pitch).

Now what?

Now that you’ve got your shiny new media kit, it’s time to send it out there to those dream collaborators. Draft your pitch, make sure it’s error free, and send that baby out. Here’s a quick, bare bones overview of the process:

First, you should introduce yourself and your blog. You should then tell a little bit about your blog. Make sure you explain what makes you different, and why working with you is a value to the company. Next, you should do “the ask”, and be specific about what your request is. After that, tell the brand exactly what you’ll do for them in return. (Never, ever forget W.I.I.F.M- What’s in it for me?) Be sure to place a link to your media kit and an attachment in the email. Make it as easy as possible for them to find out about you.

If your request doesn’t work out, do not give up. You’ve taken the first step to a brand new relationship. You can pitch again, this time with a different request, or possibly you’ve got something new to share. Put yourself in the brand’s shoes, and go another angle. Either way, you’ve got a brand new media kit, and your blogging and small business opportunities are endless!


Need help building your media kit? Check out my custom design service or my media kit e-courses
 


 

Top Podcasts for Bloggers and Influencers in 2017

toppodcastsforbloggers2017.jpg

Ready to kick your blogging into high gear? Listening to podcasts is one of the best ways to gather ideas while you're doing everyday things - cleaning, taking a shower, trying to pass the work day, exercising, or during your commute.  Here's a list of podcasts that will ignite your blogging efforts! All of these links are via iTunes. 

Kathleen Thompson and Emily Shannon, Being Boss - These two entrepreneurs are SO awesome. They talk a lot about their own businesses, but also interview some really epic guests.

Nicaila Matthews, Side Hustle Pro - Nicaila is a fellow social media marketer who talks about the ups and downs of having a full-time job and a biz on the side. Gotta love the honesty and her easy going approach. 

Myleik Teele, #MyTaughtYou - Myleik ALWAYS has some very real, very on point advice for people who want to take it to the next level. She's the big sister who's done it all, and wants to tell you the truth about your endeavors.  

Mattie James, Mattieologie - Another dose of realness that you can always refer to. Bite sized episodes equal easy binging. 

Sakita Holly, Hashtags and Stilettos - Want to see things from the PR side of things? Sakita has you covered. 

Gary Vaynerchuk, The Gary Vee Audio Experience - Just get ready. Gary is a true kick in the ass. Most of the time, you didn't even know you needed it.  

Mariah Coz and Megan Minns King, The Femtrepreneur Show - Let me tell you, I love these ladies. They taught me about creating courses, and so much about online marketing. I will never miss an episode!

Build Your Tribe w/ Chalene Johnson - Chalene is a millionaire many times over, and she's got some great, practical advice on branding and marketing. 

Social Media Social Hour, Social Media Examiner and Social Media Marketing Podcast - Okay, I listen to all three of these for the same reason. Very up to date social media info from the top names in the industry. You'll learn so much from these three podcasts. 

Erin Baynham , Upgrade Your Influence - Umm, me? I couldn't resist. My podcast teaches bloggers to be better influencers, including topics like creating media kits, creating your social media strategy, imposter syndrome and comparison and branding.  

 

Stop Comparing Yourself

I have to admit that I can be a jealous person. It's happened on too many occasions to count. There were times where I'd see my blogging peers on a trip and wonder why I wasn't invited. I'd often see people receiving samples and wonder why I wasn't sent the items too. When I saw the LinkedIn profile of the woman who got the dream gig I thought I deserved, I was upset.

But I had to put things into perspective. Maybe they're working on their blogs while I'm doing more frivolous things. The person that scored my dream job was way more qualified, with awards and diverse work experience to boot.

And then I realized what everyone else is doing has nothing to do with me. What's the point of wasting energy on something that's all in your head? Everything I have to say is in the video. I'd love to know your thoughts in the comments.

My Most Productive Blogging Tip (Works Every Time!)

 

I tried to be a good wife. We’re on our honeymoon and we are supposed to unplug and enjoy the week. But seven days with no internet can be really tough. We only have free wifi in the lobby, and it is slooooooow. Slower than slow. So slow that I can’t even open my email on it.  Josh said something so simple, and it was brilliant: Just use Word/Notepad.

I’ve read this in other blogs before, but I’ve never really needed to use it (or so I thought). Even when I've used the notes app on my cell phone, I figured it accomplished the same thing. My blogging routine has always included typing directly into my Wordpress editor and adding photos as I go. But this time, I had no internet, so a desktop publisher was my only option.  I tried it for an hour, I knocked out almost eight full posts. This never, ever happens to me when I have Internet access or a television nearby. It gave me the opportunity to focus on my writing while omitting the distractions that always suck me in on the web. 

See, I start writing a post. Then I check in on Twitter or Facebook. Then I create a link to a product on the post. Then I start to notice other products. Then I look for more music on Spotify. Thirty minutes later, I have four sentences written down. I'm working longer, not smarter.

Here’s what I did: I started writing blog prompts as large headings, then filled them in with my thoughts. When my mind wandered and I thought of a new idea, I buried that at the end of the page, and added my thoughts on the topic. (This part is definitely a mind-cluttered mess, but my A.D.D. always get the best of me.) Nevertheless, I got plenty of work done, and wasn't distracted at all! In the future, I'll turn the wifi off on my computer for an hour and just write.

How To Create a Youtube Channel Banner for Free Using Canva

When you're serious about your Youtube channel, there are a few things that you can do to brand yourself. One of the easiest ways to customize the experience for viewers is to create banner art for your homepage. I've seen people create all kinds of banners--some include their social media handles, their upload schedules, a call to action, or a collage of pictures.
Today, I'd like to share a simple tutorial that shows you how to create a simple branded Youtube channel banner using one of my favorite free web tools, Canva. I took one of the pictures from my photoshoot with my brother, and I added my social media username. In the future, I'll probably change this, but it worked well for the demo. While the banner seems simple, it gets a little tricky due to the size dimensions for TV, mobile and desktop viewers. Here's how Youtube breaks it down:

Channel art may look different on desktop, mobile, and TV displays. For the best results on all devices, we recommend uploading a single 2560 x 1440 px image. Minimum width: 2048 X 1152 px. This is the "safe area," where text and logos are guaranteed not to be cut off when displayed on different devices. Maximum width: 2560 X 423 px. This means that the "safe area" is always visible; the areas to each side of the channel art are visible depending on the viewer’s browser size. If you're not sure about the width and height of an image, download our Channel Art Templates to see how images show on different devices. You can use your computer's image editor or find one online to resize the images.

I hope this tutorial is helpful!